KID Manual - Understand the Botvinnik Structure



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KID Manual - Understand the Botvinnik Structure

GM Petar Arnaudov

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Introduction

Dear chess friends,
In this article, we continue to deal with the typical King's Indian structures. As in the first article on this subject, I am going to show all the typical positional and tactical motifs in the structure.

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On the diagram, you could see the structure that will be examined in the article. It arises when White meets the move f7-f5 by means of exf5. The exchange exf5 is good when Black can't respond with Nxf5. If Black takes on f5 with the bishop, then after g2-g4, White obtains a full control over the e4-square. If gxf5, the most popular response then is f2-f4 fixing the pawn on f5 and provoking e5-e4. In this position, the rule is that if Black has a pawn on c5, he has an acceptable position because he controls the important d4 - square; if Black's pawn is on c7, then White is better because could use the d4-square. In the game, Flor - Petrosian we will see one of the rare examples when Bxf5 is a good move. This is usually when the dark-squared bishops are missing. In Botvinnik - Boleslavsky, the Patriarch of the Soviet chess school shows us how to handle this position with White. In Petrosian - Stein and Bronstein - Petrosian, we can see Black's defensive ideas. In Kuzmin - Taimanov, we can see why exf5 does not give any advantage when Black has a Knight on e7 and can answer it with Nxf5. The last example is a recent game of mine against the silver medalist from the European Championship 2016. I managed to outplay my high rated opponent and eventually lost a completely winning position in a time trouble.

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