img_2000031062_2ebb760fab



Opening Databases


 Discounted Databases     Updated Databases   


Complete Repertoire for White after 1.c4 e5 2.g3 - Part 1

The English Opening has always been one of White's most fundamental choices. You will hardly find a top-level player who does not have this opening in his repertoire. Nowadays, in our computer-driven era, English Opening is getting even more popular. The reason is that it is by no means simple for the opponent to prepare against 1.c4. Since the pawn structure is very flexible, we have a wide range of options on every move. Therefore, in most of the lines, general understanding tends to be more important than knowledge of concrete lines. One of the most critical responses to 1.c4 is 1...e5. Black immediately grabs space in the centre and obtains a Sicilian position with colours reversed. In this database, GM Roiz starts building a complete repertoire against 1...e5. His repertoire is based on 1.c4 e5 2.g3.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Practical Repertoire against the Nimzo-Indian Defence

The Nimzo-Indian Defence has always been one of Black's most challenging weapons against 1.d4. How should we meet this opening? The main lines require enormous theoretical knowledge (you should invest a lot of time to study them) while there is no advantage. The modern computers demonstrated more than one way to equalize in all the main systems. Therefore, a more practical approach would be to focus on creating practical problems. In order to achieve it, it is enough to obtain a non-trivial position that you know better than your opponent. In the current database, GM Sundar Shyam advocates exactly this approach. His repertoire is based on the line 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd2!? (Black's alternatives on move 4 are also dealt with). The database is divided into three sections - Model Games, Theory, Test Positions. You will find 5 model games, 10 theoretical chapters and 12 interactive test positions.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Positional Repertoire against the Slav Defence

The Slav Defence is one of the most solid ways to meet 1.d4. Therefore, this opening has always been an evergreen choice in high-level chess. Building a repertoire for White is really challenging. Since there is no way to achieve an objective advantage, White shall try to create practical problems and outplay in opponent in strategically complex positions. In the current database, GM Aleksander Delchev builds a positional repertoire for White. The starting position of his survey arises after 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 The main repertoire suggested by GM Delchev is based on 4.Qc2. As an alternative, he also provides a backup repertoire with 4.Qb3. Having two options (which are quite similar strategically) allows you to adjust your choice depending on your opponent. As already mentioned, this is a positional repertoire. Hence, the understanding of the typical plans and ideas is much more important than the memorization of theoretical lines. Therefore, the author provides an extensive examination of the typical pawn structures.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Modern Repertoire against the Benko Gambit

This system with 5.e3 is getting very popular recently. It has been employed by a number of top-level players, including Aronian and Ivanchuk. The main point behind White's 5th move is to slow down Black's queenside counterplay. By immediately bringing the f1-bishop into the game, White is trying to hold the important b5-square. Later on, White will reinforce the control of b5 by means of Nc3 and a2-a4. As a result, with the b-file been blocked, Black's queenside counterplay will be highly restricted. If Black goes for a classical Benko structure, (...g7-g6, ...Bg7, . ..d7-d6, ...0-0, and ...axb5) the control of the b5-square will be very important (see the section on the pawn structures). Of course, We should be aware of some drawbacks of the move 5.e3. This move does not contribute to the fight for the centre. Additionally, White would eventually lose a tempo since in most of the lines he will play e3-e4 at some point. Taking these drawbacks into account, Black often opts for dynamic systems which are characterized by the pressure on d5. Nevertheless, my analysis shows that Black cannot solve his problems with dynamic play. In many lines, White gives his pawn back in order to overtake the initiative.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Ambitious Repertoire against the Caro-Kann

The so-called Advance Variation is White's most ambitious way to meet the Caro-Kann. The e5-pawn gives White a long-term space advantage and makes it difficult for Black to develop his kingside pieces. There are many possible setups and transpositions. Some of the lines are not concrete and you just need to know the typical plans and ideas. On the other hand, there are lines in which Black is trying to achieve immediate equality. In such lines, the play is getting pretty forced and concrete knowledge is required. GM Efimenko tried to make the repertoire as practical as possible. That is the reason why he provides you with a number of rare and almost unexplored lines and concepts.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Solid Repertoire against 1.d4 - Slav Defence - Part 1

The Slav Defence is one of the most solid options for Black against 1.d4 and part of any strong grandmaster's repertoire. The main goal is to solve the eternal problem of the light-squared bishop, keeping the chance of developing it either to f5 or g4. White has many options to fight for an advantage, but since Black's structure is very stable, the active options are very limited. The Slav is a nice opening for players that look for solid set-ups and don't care about playing with patience, improving his position slowly and collecting small strategic advantages. In his trilogy, IM Renato Quintillano is offering a complete repertoire for Black which is rich of new ideas and concepts.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Play the Open Spanish - Repertoire for Black

In this database, Mihail Marin provides a complete Black repertoire which is based on the so-called Open Spanish. The basic position of this line arises after the moves 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Nxe4 6.d4 b5 7.Bb3 d5 8.dxe5 Be6. In the introduction, GM Marin writes: "The Open (or Tarrasch) Variation in the Spanish Opening has fascinated me ever since the 1978 and 1981 Karpov-Kortschnoj matches, during which the challenger regularly used it, coming up with many new ideas. Before that, the system did not enjoy a good reputation, but the intense rehearsal during the matches provoked a real boom of the opening. For many years I had an intense but purely "platonic" sympathy for it. I finally decided to include it in my repertoire when I understood that playing the Sicilian against players like John Nunn was pure suicide. And as a reward, my first game with the Open Spanish ended in a draw against the same Dr Nunn, who one year earlier had made me the unwilling co-author of a brilliancy prize in the Najdorf! The aforementioned matches also induced a new fashion trend from White's point of view, but during the '80s, Kortschnoj introduced many new ideas in tournament games. Around 1990 a serious crisis happened, after a crucial loss of Kortschnoj to Hjartarson. I managed to play it for a few more years, switching systems when I feared concrete opponents' preparation, but around 1994 I had to resign to the evidence: Many of my favourite lines did not look playable anymore. Revisiting the variation after such a long time was refreshing. When writing this database I understood that at this stage of theory there are certain systems (mainly 9.Nbd2) in which Black has to go for dynamic play (and not for static positions, as I used to do)."

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Queen's Gambit Accepted - Complete Repertoire for Black

Queen's Gambit Accepted is one of the most fundamental and reliable openings. In the introduction to the current database, GM Hungaski writes: One of the reasons why I have been so attracted to this variation over the years (and why I believe I have been so successful with it) is due to the simplicity of Black's ideas and the practicality of the variations themselves. I began playing the Queen's Gambit Accepted nearly ten years ago. "I remember I was fed up with my bad results against 1.d4 and decided to stay away from long and complex theoretical discussions that were taking up a lot of my time and giving me little returns. Instead, I decided to choose an opening that would narrow down White's possibilities even if this meant accepting a slightly inferior (though very solid) position. To my surprise, I soon found out that White's road to advantage is not an easy one if there is one at all. In the analysis that follows, I hope to make a strong case in favour of this timeless opening based on the soundness of the arising positions and especially on the overall practicality of this opening".

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Play the Sicilian Four Knights

In this database, IM Robert Ris builds a complete repertoire for Black based on the Sicilian Four Knights. The starting position of this variation arises after 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 In this line, Black immediately puts pressure on the central squares e4 and d4. Additionally, he is planning to increase the pressure by playing ...Bb4 on the next move. This line is considered to be a very practical choice. Since Black is going for an active play at the very beginning, White's choice is limited. As a rule of thumb, by playing solid and natural moves, White does not get anything in this line. For a long period of time, the Sicilian Four Knights was considered to be slightly dubious. Nevertheless, the recent top-level and correspondence practice has proven otherwise. According to the analysis of IM Ris, currently, this variation is in a very good theoretical shape.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests

Ambitious Repertoire against the Catalan

In his first database for Modern Chess, IM Luis Rodi provides an ambitious repertoire against the Catalan. The repertoire starts with 1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.g3 Bb4+ (the authors also deals with the systems in which White delays Nf3 or c2-c4). The theoretical approach of IM Rodi is based on an in-depth analysis of positions with many pieces on the board and mutual chances. The author tends to favour aggressive ideas. Nevertheless, all his lines are completely justified from a positional point of view.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive tests