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Symmetrical English - Complete Repertoire for White (September 2020)
GM Michael Roiz Not purchased

  • 1.  Introduction and Free Preview Free
  • 2.  Typical Positions 1 Closed
  • 3.  Typical Positions 2 Closed
  • 4.  Typical Positions 3 Closed
  • 5.  Typical Positions 4 Closed
  • 6.  Symmetrical Variation - Starting Position Closed
  • 7.  Typical Positions 5 Closed
  • 8.  Typical Positions 6 Closed
  • 9.  Typical Positions 7 Closed
  • 10.  Typical Position 8 Closed
  • 11.  Typical Position 9 Closed
  • 12.  Typical Position 10 Closed
  • 13.  Typical Position 11 Closed
  • 14.  Typical Position 12 Closed
  • 15.  Typical Position 13 Closed
  • 16.  Typical Position 14 Closed
  • 17.  Typical Position 15 Closed
  • 18.  Typical Position 16 Closed
  • 19.  Chapter 1 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0 Qa5 Closed
  • 20.  Chapter 2 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0 d6 Closed
  • 21.  Chapter 3 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 d6 10.Qd3 - Sidelines Closed
  • 22.  Chapter 4 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 d6 10.Qd3 Bf5 Closed
  • 23.  Chapter 5 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0 Nxd4 9.Qxd4 d6 10.Qd3 a6 Closed
  • 24.  Chapter 6 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.0-0 Nf6 Closed
  • 25.  Chapter 7 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3 - Sidelines Closed
  • 26.  Chapter 8 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3 Nc7 Closed
  • 27.  Chapter 9 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 a6 Closed
  • 28.  Chapter 10 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 Nh6 Closed
  • 29.  Chapter 11 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.0-0 Bf5 Closed
  • 30.  Chapter 12 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.0-0 e6 Closed
  • 31.  Chapter 13 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.0-0 e5 Closed
  • 32.  Chapter 14 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 e5 Closed
  • 33.  Chapter 15 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 e6 Closed
  • 34.  Chapter 16 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 g6 4.Nc3 Bg7 5.e3 e6 Closed
  • 35.  Test Section Closed
  • 19.90 EUR






    Complete Repertoire for White after 1.c4 c5 2.g3

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    We are happy to present the amazing new opening project of GM Michael Roiz - Complete Repertoire for White after 1.c4 c5 2.g3

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    Symmetrical English is one of the most strategic openings. In order to play with success, one needs a very good understanding of the typical positional ideas and pawn structures. There are no so many lines that require memorization. Therefore, this repertoire is very attractive for people who are tired of studying long computer preparations.

    The current database consists of 3 sections - Typical Positions, Theory, and Test Section. In other words, you will find 16 must-know typical positions, 16 theoretical chapters, and 15 interactive test positions.

     Typical Positions

    In this section, the author presents 16 important typical positions. Each one of them provides you with knowledge which will make it easier for you to learn the theoretical chapters.

    Below, you can take a look at one of the positions.

    Typical Position 10

    Theoretical Section

    Chapters 1-5 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Nf6 6.d4 cxd4 7.Nxd4 0-0 8.0-0

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    This position is the main subject of the first five chapters. The c4-pawn gives White a space advantage. Additionally, the g2-bishop puts an annoying pressure on Black's queenside. 

    Given the static nature of White's advantage, Black should look for a dynamic counterplay. GM Roiz examines different approaches for Black.

    Chapter 1 deals with 8...Qa5 which is very popular. There are two ideas behind it: Black can either attack the c4-pawn (with Qc5 or Qb4) or transfer his queen to h5 in order to put some pressure on White's king. In his analysis, however, Roiz demonstrates how White can restrict Black's counterplay. 

    Chapter 2 is dedicated to 8...d6 going for a pawn sacrifice which has been known for many years and was employed by many great players such as Tal or Tseshkovsky, just to mention two of them. Nevertheless, if White knows what he is doing, Black's compensation is not sufficient. 

    Chapters 3-5 deal with the position arising after 8...Nxd4 9.Qxd4 d6 10.Qd3

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    This is probably the most important position for the variation. White has a simple plan at his disposal. After making all the necessary prophylactic moves such as Bd2, Rac1, and b2-b3, he can consider playing e2-e4 followed by Nd5. It turns out that Black has no satisfactory way of dealing with the d5-knight. The move ...e7-e6 creates a weakness on d6. At the same time, if Black exchanges the d5-knight, White will recapture with the e-pawn. Afterwards, Black has to deal with the pressure along the e-file.

    Black has two main strategies in this position - putting pressure on the c4-pawn and building a counterplay based on the advance ...b7-b5.

    Chapter 3 deals with 10...Be6 and all the sidelines Black can choose on move 10. The main moves 10...Bf5 and 10...a6 are dealt with in Chapters 4 and 5.

    Chapter 6 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.0-0 Nf6

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    As usual, by blocking his bishop Black invites White to take the upper hand in the centre.

    The critical position for the variation arises after 7.d4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Bd7

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    Only this move has independent value. Black releases the pressure on his c6-knight and keeps his king in the centre for a while. In some cases, he deviates from castling in order to play...h7-h5!? and obtains definite counter-play on the h-file.

    In this position, Roiz advocates an approach based on 9.Nxc6 Bxc6 10.e4, thus reaching a pawn structure we are already familiar with from the previous chapters. White is slightly better.

    Chapters 7-8 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 Nf6 3.Bg2 d5

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    This is a common choice for Grunfeld players. Black aims to set up a reversed Maroczy pawn structure whilst preventing White from executing the d2-d4 break.

    The first critical crossroads arises after 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.Nc3

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    Black faces a choice here. The main line is by far 5...Nc7. Black strives to play ...e7-e5 while the knight is heading towards d4. The only drawback of this standard plan is that it delays the development for a while. This move is covered in Chapter 8. Chapter 7 deals with all the alternatives Black can try on move 5. These lines, however, are less challenging and White manages to obtain an advantage.

    Chapter 9 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 a6

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    This move gained some popularity in the 1950s when it was employed by such strong players like Szabo, Reshevsky, Taimanov, and others. Black assumes that in such a closed position it can be afforded to delay the development for a while and prepare ...b7-b5 first.

    In this case, Roiz suggests the move 6.e3 with the idea to gain space in the centre by means of d2-d4. Subsequent analysis shows that White keeps a slight edge in all the lines.

    Chapter 10 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 Nh6

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    This original way of development is aimed to stop d2-d4. The critical position is being reached after 6.d4! cxd4 7.Nxd4 Nxd4 8.Bxh6 Bxh6 9.Qxd4 0-0 10.0-0

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    Despite the bishop pair, Black's position looks rather passive.

    Chapter 11 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Nc3 d6 6.0-0 Bf5

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    This somewhat unusual move became popular over the past few years. As after 5...a6, Black delays the decision regarding the development of the kingside pieces and takes control of some light squares first.

    Against this line, Roiz suggests going for a quick a2-a3 followed by b2-b4, even at the price of a pawn sacrifice. Before proceeding with the theory of this line, you need to pay attention to the Typical Positions section. There you will find an explanation of how to deal with the queenside tension.

    Chapter 12 - 1.c4 c5 2.g3 g6 3.Bg2 Bg7 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Nf3 d6 6.0-0 e6

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     In comparison with 5...e6 Black keeps the d6-square under control. That said, the early ...d7-d6 also means that Black will hardly play d6-d5 anytime soon. 

    Once again, Roiz goes for a central strategy - 7.e3 Nge7 8.d4 0-0 9.Re1