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Positional Repertoire against the Slav Defence (February 2020)
GM Aleksander Delchev Not purchased

  • 1.  Introduction and Free Preview Free
  • 2.  Structure 1 - Overview Closed
  • 3.  Structure 1 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 4.  Structure 1 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 5.  Structure 1 - Tests Closed
  • 6.  Structure 2 - Overview Closed
  • 7.  Structure 2 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 8.  Structure 2 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 9.  Structure 2 - Tests Closed
  • 10.  Structure 3 - Overview Closed
  • 11.  Structure 3 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 12.  Structure 3 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 13.  Structure 3 - Tests Closed
  • 14.  Structure 4 - Overview Closed
  • 15.  Structure 4 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 16.  Structure 4 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 17.  Structure 4 - Tests Closed
  • 18.  Chapter 1 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 a6 Closed
  • 19.  Chapter 2 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 Bg4 Closed
  • 20.  Chapter 3 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 dxc4 Closed
  • 21.  Chapter 4 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bf5 Closed
  • 22.  Chapter 5 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 c5 Closed
  • 23.  Chapter 6 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Na6 Closed
  • 24.  Chapter 7 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Be6 Closed
  • 25.  Chapter 8 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Qa5 Closed
  • 26.  Chapter 9 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.cxd5 Closed
  • 27.  Chapter 10 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Qa5 Closed
  • 28.  Chapter 11 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Be7 Closed
  • 29.  Chapter 13 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Nbd7 Closed
  • 30.  Chapter 14 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Bxf3 Closed
  • 31.  Chapter 15 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Qb3 Closed
  • 32.  Chapter 16 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.b3 Closed
  • 33.  Chapter 17 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Ne5 Closed
  • 34.  Chapter 18 – 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Nb6 Closed
  • 35.  Chapter 19 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Bd6 Closed
  • 36.  Chapter 20 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 Closed
  • 37.  Chapter 21 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 e5 Closed
  • 38.  Chapter 22 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Rc8 Closed
  • 39.  Chapter 23 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Qc7 Closed
  • 40.  Chapter 24 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.Bg5 Closed
  • 41.  Chapter 25 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.g3 Closed
  • 42.  Chapter 26 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.Bg5 Closed
  • 43.  Chapter 27 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.g3 Closed
  • 44.  Chapter 28 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 g6 Closed
  • 45.  Model Game 2 Closed
  • 46.  Model Game 3 Closed
  • 47.  Model Game 4 Closed
  • 48.  Model Game 5 Closed
  • 49.  Model Game 6 Closed
  • 50.  Model Game 7 Closed
  • 51.  Model Game 8 Closed
  • 52.  Model Game 9 Closed
  • 53.  Model Game 10 Closed
  • 19.90 EUR


    Introduction

    The Slav Defence is one of the most solid ways to meet 1.d4. Therefore, this opening has always been an evergreen choice in high-level chess. Building a repertoire for White is really challenging. Since there is no way to achieve an objective advantage, White shall try to create practical problems and outplay in opponent in strategically complex positions.

    In the current database, GM Aleksander Delchev builds a positional repertoire for White. The starting position of his survey arises after 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6

    img_5722626453_10d2d99205

    The main repertoire suggested by GM Delchev is based on 4.Qc2. As an alternative, he also provides a backup repertoire with 4.Qb3. Having two options (which are quite similar strategically) allows you to adjust your choice depending on your opponent.

    As already mentioned, this is a positional repertoire. Hence, the understanding of the typical plans and ideas is much more important than the memorization of theoretical lines. Therefore, the author provides an extensive examination of the typical pawn structures.

    Typical Pawn Structures

    GM Delchev starts the database with an explanation of 4 typical pawn structures. Make sure to read this section before proceeding with the theoretical part.

    The presentation of each pawn structure contains an overview of the main ideas, 2 model games and 10 test positions.

    Structure 1 

    img_6305838924_bf1b826a26

    This pawn structure is typical for many lines of the Queen's Gambit Declined, the Gruenfeld and the Slav Defense. In our repertoire, we reach this structure in the line 4.Qc2 g6 when Black is attracted by winning a tempo with 5...Bf5 6.Qb3 Qb6 7.c5 Qxb3 8.axb3.

    Structure 2

    img_5798517697_39c5616284

    This structure is more typical for the Exchange Slav with 3.cxd5 cxd5. Black's g7 bishop is biting on the e3, d4 wall and the weakening of the dark squares on the queenside (c5, c7, d6) automatically makes the situation far more pleasant for White The control over the only open file is of primary importance. It is usually White who manages this while Black urgently needs to redirect the dark-squared bishop back to the f8-a3 diagonal. The endgames are in White's favour as well because there is nothing Black can do against the increasing queenside pressure.

    Structure 3

    img_6406320555_9fa811a305

    This pawn structure shows White's main aim in the whole 4.Qc2 system is. The main reason why I started my investigation was that I saw how effortlessly White won in the two model games.
    Everybody knows how dangerous it is to leave one of our pieces out of play. "If one piece stands badly then the whole position is bad", to paraphrase Tarrasch is also valid in the position on the diagram. White has many ways to profit from this domination

    Structure 4

    img_8904358500_efddb8b372

    This structure is typical for the line 4...dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.e4 Bxf3 8.gxf3 e5. Usually in this structure, the kings get castled to opposite sides which considerably sharpens the fight. White's spoiled pawn structure is compensated by the bishop pair in a position with an open centre.

    As an example, we shall take a look at the coverage of Structure 1.

    Structure 1

    img_6305838924_bf1b826a26

    Overview

    This pawn structure is typical for many lines of the Queen's Gambit Declined, the Gruenfeld and the Slav Defense. In our repertoire, we reach this structure in the line 4.Qc2 g6 when Black is attracted by winning a tempo with 5...Bf5 6.Qb3 Qb6 7.c5 Qxb3 8.axb3.
    What is it all about?
    White's pawns are doubled but as a compensation, he obtains a huge space advantage on the queenside. A simple and very effective plan is to undouble the pawns by means of b4-b5. Black usually has enough time to avoid that by playing a7-a6 and moving the rook out of the pin. But even then is it too early to relax. By moving one of his knights to a5, White can put pressure on the biggest defect in Black's position - the b7-pawn.
    Black's only hope lays in the counterattack with a quick e7-e5 blocking the f4 bishop and trying to redirect White's attention. Then Black could start breathing as the long-ranging f4-bishop would be out of play and his pieces could come to life.
    The most important White piece is the Bf4, therefore the prophylactic h2-h3 is an obligatory measure.
    Most of the test positions are about White's tactical hits on the queenside.
    I think Black should better avoid this endgame, but if it is not possible then to focus on eliminating White's dark-squared bishop rather than on passive defence.

    Model Games

     Interactive Tests

    Note that it is not important to find all the moves in the test positions. You should just try to guess the right plan and the first couple of moves.

    The other 3 structures are covered in the same way.

    Theoretical Section 

    The theoretical section contains 28 chapters.
    Delchev’s main recommendation 4.Qc2 is analyzed in the first 25 chapters. The last 3 are dedicated to the alternative 4.Qb3, where the ideas are quite similar. This line often transposes to 4.Qc2 (after 4…dxc4).
    Chapter 1 – 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 a6

    img_1541190482_257eb760c0

    This is a rare line. Black is playing in the “Chebanenko style”. Against 4.Qc2 the move 4…a6 is less useful. White’s best continuation is 5.Bf4 with an advantage.

    Chapter 2 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 Bg4

    img_8544842085_dba014fc34

    The other sideline which just leads to troubles for Black. White’s best option is 5.Ne5 and according to the author White is better in all lines.

    In Chapters 3-8, Delchev analyses one of the main replies to 4.Qc2 – the move 4...g6

    img_6131892359_da88e8f9bb

    There is one important difference between the 4.Qc2 g6 system and the Gruenfeld Defence which is in White's favour:
    In the Gruenfeld Defence, Black usually challenges the centre with ...c7-c5, while in the 4.Qc2 g6 line, Black is only holding it with c6 and d5.
    If Black is looking for active counterplay, at some point, he has to play ...c6-c5 which would lose a clear tempo compared to the Gruenfeld lines. Another option for creating counterplay is to chase White's queen by means of ...Bf5 & ...Na6-b4.

    Chapter 3 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 dxc4

    img_8617432706_1d97609eb5

    The move is one of the most interesting replies for Black. Black is playing in the Gruenfeld spirit. This continuation was praised by IM Renato Quintillano in his wonderful database for Modern Chess. 
    The main line goes 6.Qxc4 where Black has two options: the rare 6…Be6 (Quintillano’s choice) or to enters some “deep Gruenfeld theory after 6…Bg7 7.0-0 0-0.
    Delchev analyses these positions in detail and finds interesting new concepts where White’s play seems to be easier.

    Chapter 4 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bf5

    img_3694540470_ee7ded0dfa

    Developing the bishop with tempo seems tempting, but this move is dubious and leads to a quite comfortable advantage for White. After 6.Qb3 Qb6 7.e3, White is trying to reach Structure 1.
    It seems that White’s position is preferable in all lines.

    Chapters 5 – 8 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7

    img_5871103964_7aab45bee7

    In these chapters, GM Delchev investigates the main continuation for Black.
    The main line continues 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3. We reach a critical position for the variation.
    In different chapters, the author analyses 7...c5 7…Na6, 7…Be6, 7…Qa5.
    The arising positions resemble the Gruenfeld Defence and the author as an “expert” there shows the pros and cons of Black’s setup. He manages to find several new ideas, thus proving that Black can’t fully equalize.

    Chapter 9 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.cxd5

    img_6636078172_00dad80aec

    In this chapter, the author provides us with an alternative for White on move 5.
    The positions after 5.cxd5 cxd5 resemble the Exchange Slav . The position is not simple and Black needs to play very carefully to equalize. The objective conclusion is that Black equalizes with an accurate play.

    Chapter 10 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Qa5

    img_2089450839_853155c49d

    The arising positions are very interesting and sharp. Delchev suggests several improvements to the current theory and finds White’s position preferable.

    Chapter 11 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Be7

    img_2911989063_a43f556612

    Here after the moves 7.Nc3 0-0, we achieve one of the starting positions of Queens Gambit Declined.
    The author suggests 8.Rd1 and explains the arising positions in detail.

    Chapter 12 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.Nbd2

    img_3039469789_814bfb6cab

    This setup is an alternative to the main lines. White’s main goal is to reach the Catalan type of position after 6…Be7 7.g3! (6…Qa5 is well met by 7.a3! with an advantage for White)

    Chapter 13 – 26 are dedicated to the main reply for Black after 4.Qc2 – the move 4…dxc4
    Chapter 13 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Nbd7

    img_7688591260_ef6647e0ba

    The positions after 5…Bg4 are quite unbalanced. The author's preference is to meet this move with the calm 6.Nbd2, but he also analyses the alternative and the more sharp line 6.Nc3.
    In this chapter, the Delchev makes an overview of the line with 6…Nbd7 which is the strongest move for Black in his opinion.

    Chapter 14 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Bxf3

    img_5988463529_9328b9aacd

    The move 6…Bxf3 is significantly worse than 6…Nbd7 and offers White excellent attacking possibilities.

    Chapter 15 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Qb3

    img_6740831619_ef552e9806

    In this chapter, the author starts investigating the more positional 6.Nbd2. According to him, this is the strongest reply to 5…Bg4. The mainline continues Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 where White is on a crossroad. In this chapter, you will find analyzed the move 10.Qb3

    Chapter 16 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.b3

    img_2208273038_3ebdcaa1f2

    This chapter deals with 10.b3 which is White's most natural option. Black has many possible plans here, but he must hurry to create concrete counterplay by c6-c5, as otherwise, he risks falling under pressure once White completes the bind with Bb2, Rac1, Rfd1.

    Chapter 17 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Ne5

    img_4468130772_dd3988b56b

    The idea behind this natural move is to exchange a pair of knights and to win more space in the centre by means of e2-e4 which will leave Black’s bishop out of play. The inventor of this idea is the great Hungarian Grandmaster Lajos Portisch. Nowadays this system it is preferred by many outstanding theoreticians like GM’s Harikrishna, Ivanchuk, Vitiugov, Bologan , Vaganian, and many others.

    Chapter 18 – 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5

    img_9383777784_e22187a0fe

    This is the most solid choice for Black. The advantage of this move compared to 5…Bg4 is that from here the bishop is controlling the e4-square and is not under attack after Ne5.

    The mainline continues 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0
    Black's most popular choice here is the move 8…Be7, but in this chapter, the author examines the solid alternative 8…Nb6.

    img_3088916874_debced0615

    The main idea is revealed after 9.Qb3 Qd5. Black wants to enter the slightly inferior endgame.

    Chapter 19 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Bd6

    img_1263958200_6a1d774c1c

    Black prepares to challenge the centre by means of e6-e5. The move is less popular than the mainline – 8…Be7 mainly because of the following line 9.Nc3 0-0 10.Nh4! and White is better in all the lines.

    Chapter 20 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7

    img_9426471292_2d4d6fad05

    This is the main line of the variation with 4.Qc2. The theory continues – 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1
    In this chapter, the author deals with 10…Qb6 which fails to equalize.

    Chapter 21 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 e5

    img_3503536632_424b8c8133

    The immediate strike in the centre is quite interesting but fails to equalize. The best reaction for White is 11.Nc3 Qc7 12.e4! with an advantage.

    Chapter 22 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Rc8

    img_8538307888_96f90fb7ef

    The author praises this move a lot and examines it in details. He manages to find new and unexplored ideas and proves that White’s play is easier.

    Chapter 23 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Qc7

    img_3755809148_66257daa17

    This is the main option for Black. Delchev has experience here with both colours and makes a full overview of the variation. He found a new idea which questions Black’s chances to equalize.

    Chapter 24 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.Bg5

    img_8747796711_6621eb37c4

    The variation with 5…e6 is slightly passive. As usual White has a choice between 6.Bg5 and 6.g3. The author analyzes both. In this chapter, you will find the more active 6.Bg5

    Chapter 25 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.g3

    img_6589092584_5e2ec745a8

    This line transposes to the Catalan. The equalizing line is quite narrow and If Black doesn’t know it can easily get into trouble.

    Chapter 26 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.Bg5

    img_9187591821_af5f791e36

    The variation with 4.Qb3 is also quite playable. After 4…dxc4 we transpose to the lines analyzed earlier in the database. The main differences are after 4…e6 and 4…g6.
    In this chapter, the author analyzes the position after 4…e6 5.Bg5
    In this position, he checks 6 different options for Black. The objective conclusion is that Black equalizes in this line.

    Chapter 27 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.g3

    img_4518495227_0b0dfee282

    The most ambitious try for White is to seek an advantage in Catalan type of positions.
    Delchev provides us with interesting ideas and proves that Black’s task is far from easy.

    Chapter 28 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 g6

    img_2283683232_51e8d0c220

    This move is inaccurate after 4.Qb3. White easily achieves a stable advantage after 5.Nc3 Bg7 6.cxd5 cxd5 7.Bg5!
    White starts creating threats and Black's position is unpleasant.

    Model Games

    At the end of the database, GM Delchev provides 10 model games which at the same time are historically important for the development of the variation.

     

     

     

     

     



    Positional Repertoire against the Slav Defence (February 2020)
    GM Aleksander Delchev Not purchased

  • 1.  Introduction and Free Preview Free
  • 2.  Structure 1 - Overview Closed
  • 3.  Structure 1 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 4.  Structure 1 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 5.  Structure 1 - Tests Closed
  • 6.  Structure 2 - Overview Closed
  • 7.  Structure 2 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 8.  Structure 2 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 9.  Structure 2 - Tests Closed
  • 10.  Structure 3 - Overview Closed
  • 11.  Structure 3 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 12.  Structure 3 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 13.  Structure 3 - Tests Closed
  • 14.  Structure 4 - Overview Closed
  • 15.  Structure 4 - Model Game 1 Closed
  • 16.  Structure 4 - Model Game 2 Closed
  • 17.  Structure 4 - Tests Closed
  • 18.  Chapter 1 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 a6 Closed
  • 19.  Chapter 2 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 Bg4 Closed
  • 20.  Chapter 3 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 dxc4 Closed
  • 21.  Chapter 4 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bf5 Closed
  • 22.  Chapter 5 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 c5 Closed
  • 23.  Chapter 6 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Na6 Closed
  • 24.  Chapter 7 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Be6 Closed
  • 25.  Chapter 8 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.Bf4 Bg7 6.e3 0-0 7.Nc3 Qa5 Closed
  • 26.  Chapter 9 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 g6 5.cxd5 Closed
  • 27.  Chapter 10 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Qa5 Closed
  • 28.  Chapter 11 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 e6 5.Bg5 Nbd7 6.e3 Be7 Closed
  • 29.  Chapter 13 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Nbd7 Closed
  • 30.  Chapter 14 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nc3 Bxf3 Closed
  • 31.  Chapter 15 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Qb3 Closed
  • 32.  Chapter 16 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.b3 Closed
  • 33.  Chapter 17 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bg4 6.Nbd2 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.0-0 0-0 10.Ne5 Closed
  • 34.  Chapter 18 – 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Nb6 Closed
  • 35.  Chapter 19 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Bd6 Closed
  • 36.  Chapter 20 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 Closed
  • 37.  Chapter 21 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 e5 Closed
  • 38.  Chapter 22 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Rc8 Closed
  • 39.  Chapter 23 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.g3 e6 7.Bg2 Nbd7 8.0-0 Be7 9.e3 0-0 10.Rd1 Qc7 Closed
  • 40.  Chapter 24 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.Bg5 Closed
  • 41.  Chapter 25 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 e6 6.g3 Closed
  • 42.  Chapter 26 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.Bg5 Closed
  • 43.  Chapter 27 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 e6 5.g3 Closed
  • 44.  Chapter 28 - 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qb3 g6 Closed
  • 45.  Model Game 2 Closed
  • 46.  Model Game 3 Closed
  • 47.  Model Game 4 Closed
  • 48.  Model Game 5 Closed
  • 49.  Model Game 6 Closed
  • 50.  Model Game 7 Closed
  • 51.  Model Game 8 Closed
  • 52.  Model Game 9 Closed
  • 53.  Model Game 10 Closed