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Opening Databases (110)


Play the Bogo-Indian Defence - Part 2

Welcome to the second (and final) database dedicated to the Bogo-Indian Defence. Our starting position arises after the moves 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 Bb4+ 4.Nbd2 There is a small psychological paradox connected with this move. It is true that 4.Bd2 avoids any early commitments, and is likely to maintain the fluency of White's play. But at the same time we have seen that with a minimum of accuracy, Black usually obtains a rock-solid position with good chances of counterplay. After 4.Nbd2 things are more double-edged strategically. While the knight is not optimally placed on d2, White launches an open invitation to what he hopes to prove an improved Nimzo-Indian, by forcing the exchange on d2 with a2-a3, thus avoiding the doubled pawns on the c-file. But at the same time, the last move restricts White's choice of plans, allowing Black to more or less dictate the middlegame structure.

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Ambitious Repertoire against the Gruenfeld

In his first database for Modern Chess, the Ukrainian FM Yuriy Krykun builds a very challenging yet underestimated weapon against the Grunfeld Defence. The first important position of his repertoire arises after 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 7.Nf3 c5 8.Bb5+

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Play the Bogo-Indian Defence - Part 1

The suggested repertoire for Black in the Bogo-Indian with 4.Bd2 is both rock-solid and ambitious. Despite White’s space advantage and apparent superior activity, Black can not only keep his own but also find promising ways to counterplay. Many of Black’s wins were possible because of White’s over-optimism in the attempt to use his trumps. The magic of this system is even more obvious when comparing with the King’s Indian, a supposedly more aggressive opening leading to similar structures but with the dark-squared bishops on board. This repertoire does not require memorizing long forced lines, as the focus is on understanding the typical structures.

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Modern Repertoire against the Catalan

This variation might be a serious contender replacing the Old Main Line. It does, in my opinion, indeed lead to much more adventurous position than current Main Line of the Catalan, reached after 4...Be7 5.Bg2 0-0 6.0-0 dxc4. One little warning, or rather see it as an encouraging message, particularly the Main Lines after 4...dxc4 5.Bg2 a6, covered in the last chapters contain an incredibly deep, computer-assisted analysis. We aren't playing this system to equalize, but rather try to put White under pressure by sticking to our extra pawn. We are looking for our own chances! Most of the Chapters offer imbalanced pawn structures or material distribution, offering good practical chances to play for a win, once we leave the theoretical territory.

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Complete Repertoire for White after 1.c4 e5 2.g3 - Part 2

In the second database of his English series, GM Michael Roiz completes his repertoire after 1.c4 e5 2.g3. Contrary to Part 1, with rare exceptions, the current database features systems in which the play is more positional. Therefore, when studying this database, one should mostly concentrate on the understanding of the typical pawn structures and plans. In what concerns the theory, true to his approach, GM Roiz always tries to come up with original and less explored concepts.

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Complete Repertoire for White after 1.c4 e5 2.g3 - Part 1

The English Opening has always been one of White's most fundamental choices. You will hardly find a top-level player who does not have this opening in his repertoire. Nowadays, in our computer-driven era, English Opening is getting even more popular. The reason is that it is by no means simple for the opponent to prepare against 1.c4. Since the pawn structure is very flexible, we have a wide range of options on every move. Therefore, in most of the lines, general understanding tends to be more important than knowledge of concrete lines. One of the most critical responses to 1.c4 is 1...e5. Black immediately grabs space in the centre and obtains a Sicilian position with colours reversed. In this database, GM Roiz starts building a complete repertoire against 1...e5. His repertoire is based on 1.c4 e5 2.g3.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive Tests


Practical Repertoire against the Nimzo-Indian Defence

The Nimzo-Indian Defence has always been one of Black's most challenging weapons against 1.d4. How should we meet this opening? The main lines require enormous theoretical knowledge (you should invest a lot of time to study them) while there is no advantage. The modern computers demonstrated more than one way to equalize in all the main systems. Therefore, a more practical approach would be to focus on creating practical problems. In order to achieve it, it is enough to obtain a non-trivial position that you know better than your opponent. In the current database, GM Sundar Shyam advocates exactly this approach. His repertoire is based on the line 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.e3 0-0 5.Bd2!? (Black's alternatives on move 4 are also dealt with). The database is divided into three sections - Model Games, Theory, Test Positions. You will find 5 model games, 10 theoretical chapters and 12 interactive test positions.

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Positional Repertoire against the Slav Defence

The Slav Defence is one of the most solid ways to meet 1.d4. Therefore, this opening has always been an evergreen choice in high-level chess. Building a repertoire for White is really challenging. Since there is no way to achieve an objective advantage, White shall try to create practical problems and outplay in opponent in strategically complex positions. In the current database, GM Aleksander Delchev builds a positional repertoire for White. The starting position of his survey arises after 1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 The main repertoire suggested by GM Delchev is based on 4.Qc2. As an alternative, he also provides a backup repertoire with 4.Qb3. Having two options (which are quite similar strategically) allows you to adjust your choice depending on your opponent. As already mentioned, this is a positional repertoire. Hence, the understanding of the typical plans and ideas is much more important than the memorization of theoretical lines. Therefore, the author provides an extensive examination of the typical pawn structures.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive Tests


Modern Repertoire against the Benko Gambit

This system with 5.e3 is getting very popular recently. It has been employed by a number of top-level players, including Aronian and Ivanchuk. The main point behind White's 5th move is to slow down Black's queenside counterplay. By immediately bringing the f1-bishop into the game, White is trying to hold the important b5-square. Later on, White will reinforce the control of b5 by means of Nc3 and a2-a4. As a result, with the b-file been blocked, Black's queenside counterplay will be highly restricted. If Black goes for a classical Benko structure, (...g7-g6, ...Bg7, . ..d7-d6, ...0-0, and ...axb5) the control of the b5-square will be very important (see the section on the pawn structures). Of course, We should be aware of some drawbacks of the move 5.e3. This move does not contribute to the fight for the centre. Additionally, White would eventually lose a tempo since in most of the lines he will play e3-e4 at some point. Taking these drawbacks into account, Black often opts for dynamic systems which are characterized by the pressure on d5. Nevertheless, my analysis shows that Black cannot solve his problems with dynamic play. In many lines, White gives his pawn back in order to overtake the initiative.

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Ambitious Repertoire against the Caro-Kann

The so-called Advance Variation is White's most ambitious way to meet the Caro-Kann. The e5-pawn gives White a long-term space advantage and makes it difficult for Black to develop his kingside pieces. There are many possible setups and transpositions. Some of the lines are not concrete and you just need to know the typical plans and ideas. On the other hand, there are lines in which Black is trying to achieve immediate equality. In such lines, the play is getting pretty forced and concrete knowledge is required. GM Efimenko tried to make the repertoire as practical as possible. That is the reason why he provides you with a number of rare and almost unexplored lines and concepts.

Features:     Downloadable in PGN      Interactive Tests