Practical 1.d4 Repertoire for White Part 2

Must-Know Endgames for 1.d4 Players

From Club Player to Expert with GM Nikola Nestorovic (10 hours 9 mins Video Running Time) 

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Content  (37 Articles)

Introduction and Free Preview  Free
  • Video Introduction  Closed
  • Chapter 1.1. Tactical patterns  Closed
  • Chapter 1.2. The attack is better than the defense  Closed
  • Chapter 1.3. Pawn rush  Closed
  • Chapter 1.4. Rook is going to a better square  Closed
  • Chapter 1.5. Destruction of the pawn structure  Closed
  • Chapter 1.6. Bring the rook for the mate!  Closed
  • Chapter 1.7. Right trade at the right moment  Closed
  • Chapter 2.1. Dance of the black knight  Closed
  • Chapter 2.2. Activity  Closed
  • Chapter 2.3. Knight is better than rook  Closed
  • Chapter 2.4. Weak squares  Closed
  • Chapter 2.5. How to prevent your opponent plan  Closed
  • Chapter 3.1. King’s Indian opening plans through history  Closed
  • Chapter 3.2. My first victory against GM  Closed
  • Chapter 3.3. No chance for black  Closed
  • Chapter 4.1. Active rook  Closed
  • Chapter 4.2. Passive play – bad result  Closed
  • Chapter 4.3. One bad move is enough to lose  Closed
  • Chapter 4.4. Passed Pawn  Closed
  • Chapter 4.5. Strength of the bishop pair in the endgame  Closed
  • Chapter 4.6. Knight vs Bishop  Closed
  • Chapter 4.7. Find the right weakness and exploit it  Closed
  • Chapter 4.8. Find the right weakness and exploit it  Closed
  • Chapter 5.1. Fewer trades – more pressure  Closed
  • Chapter 5.2. Knight sacrifice for the two pawns and activity  Closed
  • Chapter 5.3. 4th move h3  Closed
  • Chapter 5.4. 8th move g4  Closed
  • Chapter 5.5. How to punish too many pawn moves in the opening  Closed
  • Chapter 5.6. Strange opening against a strong opponent  Closed
  • Chapter 5.6. Strange opening against a strong opponent  Closed
  • Chapter 6.1. Wait for your chance and use it  Closed
  • Chapter 6.2. Better concentration – fewer blunders  Closed
  • Chapter 6.3. French Defense in a strategic way  Closed
  • Chapter 6.4. Keep it strong after a blunder  Closed
  • Summary  Closed
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    From Club Player to Expert with GM Nikola Nestorovic

    Have you ever wondered why some players are stuck at 1400-1600 Elo… for years.

    While others skyrocket to 1900, 2100, 2200  Elo… while training equally hard?

    GM Nikola Nestorovic has been coaching for nearly 10 years. He developed his own training to take a 1400-1600 rated player to a tournament player level and beyond.

    It’s based on 5 concepts:

    1. Tactical Patterns
    2. Strategical Patterns
    3. Middlegame Ideas
    4. Endgame Ideas
    5. Opening Ideas

    It helped Katarina to become a U16 National Champ.

    It helped a 15-year-old Josiah from California to obtain his FM and IM norms.

    It also helped Elie to boost his rating from under 1600 to over 2000.

    And it will help you as well.

    GM Nestorovic compressed everything into a single 10-hour course. Brought everything up to date. Refined all the examples. Thoroughly annotated games.

    And today you can get started with this truly unique training and become a much stronger player in a matter of weeks, not years!

    Here is what you will learn:

    • Destruction of the pawn structure – Learn how to systematically dismantle your opponent’s pawn structure, creating weaknesses that you can exploit to gain a strategic advantage
    • Fewer trades = more pressure – Discover how to apply consistent pressure on your opponent without resorting to useless exchanges
    • The Knight Dance – Master the art of knight maneuvers, a crucial aspect of chess strategy that is often overlooked
    • The Pawn Rush – Learn how to seize control of the center of the board and create attacking opportunities. You’ll learn how to use the pawn rush effectively and how to respond when your opponent uses it against you
    • How to beat a Grandmaster – Finally, discover the secrets to beating even the best players in the world. Learn how to think like a Grandmaster, anticipate your opponent’s moves, and outmaneuver them at every turn

    If you are ready to put in the work and see serious results, then this training is for you.

    Outline:

    Introduction
    Chapter 1.1. Tactical patterns
    Chapter 1.2. The attack is better than the defense
    Chapter 1.3. Pawn rush
    Chapter 1.4. Rook is going to a better square
    Chapter 1.5. Destruction of the pawn structure
    Chapter 1.6. Bring the rook for the mate!
    Chapter 1.7. Right trade at the right moment
    Chapter 2.1. Dance of the black knight
    Chapter 2.2. Activity
    Chapter 2.3. Knight is better than rook
    Chapter 2.4. Weak squares
    Chapter 3.1. King’s Indian opening plans through history
    Chapter 3.2. My first victory against GM
    Chapter 3.3. No chance for black
    Chapter 4.1. Active rook
    Chapter 4.2. Passive play – bad result
    Chapter 4.3. One bad move is enough to lose
    Chapter 4.4. Passed Pawn
    Chapter 4.5. Strength of the bishop pair in the endgame
    Chapter 4.6. Knight vs Bishop
    Chapter 4.7. Find the right weakness and exploit it
    Chapter 5.1. Fewer trades – more pressure
    Chapter 5.2. Knight sacrifice for the two pawns and activity
    Chapter 5.3. 4th move h3
    Chapter 5.4. 8th move g4
    Chapter 5.5. How to punish too many pawn moves in the opening
    Chapter 5.6. Strange opening against a strong opponent
    Chapter 6.1. Wait for your chance and use it
    Chapter 6.2. Better concentration – fewer blunders
    Chapter 6.3. French Defense in a strategic way
    Chapter 6.4. Keep it strong after a blunder
    Summary

    About the Author:

    GM Nikola Nestorovic [2516 FIDE]

    is a Grandmaster from Serbia and has been playing chess for over 20 years. Nikola became a GM in 2015 and FIDE Trainer in 2018. He is very passionate about coaching and holds Bachelor’s degree in Education. GM Nestorovic is a winner of multiple prestigious National and International tournaments. He is also a head coach of a Serbian chess school and the author of numerous books.