Reti Opening - Repertoire for White after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 (4h Running Time) 

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Introduction and Free Preview  Free
  • Queen's Gambit Declined and Queen's Indian Defence Approaches - Video Lecture  Closed
  • Queen's Gambit approach 4...Be7 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 1: Part 1  Closed
  • Queen's Indian approach 4...b6 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 1: Part 2  Closed
  • 4th move sidelines - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 1: Part 3  Closed
  • Tarrasch Defence and Queen's Gambit Accepted Approaches - Video Lecture  Closed
  • Tarrasch approach 4...c5 5.cxd5 exd5 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 2: Part 1  Closed
  • Semi-Tarrasch approach 5...Nxd5 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 2: Part 2  Closed
  • Queen's gambit accepted 4...dxc4 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 2: Part 3  Closed
  • Slav Defence Approach - Video Lecture  Closed
  • Semi-Slav approach 3...c6 4.Nc3 e6 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 3: Part 1  Closed
  • 4...Nbd7 and other Slav sidelines - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 3: Part 2  Closed
  • Principled Approach and Sidelines - Video Lecture  Closed
  • Principled approach 2...c5 - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 4: Part 1  Closed
  • 2nd move rare sidelines - Keymer Reti 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 - Lecture 4: Part 2  Closed
  • Q&A Session  Closed
  • 49.00 EUR






    Reti Opening - Repertoire for White after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3

    GM-Davorin-Kuljasevic-89100b385a

    The camp of GM Kuljasevic - Reti Opening - Repertoire for White after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 is already a digital product. 

    This product includes all the videos from the workshop as well as the PGN file related to the training sessions. Overall, the material consists of 6 hours of video and a PGN database, which includes 10 huge theoretical files! 

    You will find the following lectures:

    ✅ 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 - Queen's Gambit Declined and Queen's Indian Defence Approaches

    ✅ 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 c5 and 3...dxc4 - Tarrasch Defence and Queen's Gambit Accepted Approaches 

    ✅ 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.Nc3 - Slav Defence Approach

    ✅ 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5 3.b3 - Principled Approach and Sidelines

    Now, we shall take a look at the different lectures.

    1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 - Queen's Gambit Declined and Queen's Indian Defence Approaches

    The first lecture is dedicated to two of the most solid setups that Black can choose against our version of the Reti Opening - Queen's Gambit Declined setup and Queen's Indian Defence setup.

    The first important position of the Queen's Gambit Declined setup is being reached after the moves 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.b3 0-0 6.Bb2

    Reti-Opening-1-46c1f29aaf

    As a matter of fact, the ever-solid Queen's Gambit declined can be quite vulnerable to White's setup. For instance, in many lines, White goes for Qc2 and 0-0-0 followed by a kingside attack. Black should handle the arising positions with a lot of precision in order not to find himself in huge trouble.

    Against the Queen's Indian Defence approach, GM Kuljasevic suggests 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 b6 5.cxd5 exd5 6.g3

    Reti-Opening-2-ade53660e9

    This move is one of the cornerstones of the Keymer system, and White has scored very well with it in practice. Even though we opened the f1-a6 diagonal for our bishop as early as move two, we change the plan and intend to fianchetto it. This way of development has two advantages. Firstly, from g2, the bishop can attack the d5-pawn more easily. Secondly, the g3-pawn limits the impact of the black DSB, which is bound to be developed to d6.

    1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 c5 and 3...dxc4 - Tarrasch Defence and Queen's Gambit Accepted Approaches 

    In this lecture, the focus is on variations where Black wants to equalize by clearing up the center with ....c5  and/or ...dxc4 at the earliest opportunity. These approaches are the equivalent of the Tarrasch Defence and Queen's Gambit Accepted. Indeed, we will see that the lines sometimes transpose from the Keymer variation into one of these openings.

    Against the Tarrasch Defence, GM Kuljasevic suggests 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 c5 5.cxd5 exd5 6.d4

    Reti-Opening-3-ee0ffff7eb

    Black has several playable continuations at this point. In most of the cases, we should be ready to play against an IQP. Besides providing the most theoretically precise lines, in his annotations, GM Kuljasevic also explains the must-know strategic concepts in such kind of positions.

    Against the Semi-Tarrasch move order arising after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 c5 5.cxd5 Nxd5, Kuljasevic suggests 6.Bc4.

    Reti-Opening-4-0e7e8b3e3d

    White completes his developments and keeps d2-d4 as an option. Further analysis shows that it's still not easy for Black to completely neutralize White's initiative.

    The Queen's Gambit Accepted approach is characterized by the following move order: 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 dxc4

    Reti-Opening-5-ffca4db2c0

    This capture might seem premature and less principled than other options Black has at this junction. However, black players usually know what they are doing when they play this way—they are ready to play the QGA (Queen's Gambit Accepted) type of position. While it's not the most ambitious approach for Black, it is one of the most solid ways to meet our version of the Reti Opening.

    The main line goes 5.Bxc4 a6 6.0-0 b5 7.Bb3!?

    Reti-Opening-6-dad1f376f1

    The retreat to e2 is more popular, but it leads to a quieter game where White follows up with a2-a4, etc. With this move, we want to play for the initiative in the center instead. Analysis shows that Black should be very precise in order to equalize.

    1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.Nc3 - Slav Defence Approach

    The Slav Defence approach arises after 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 Nf6 3.c4 c6

    Reti-Opening-7-3c22b95a41

    Players who normally play the Slav Defence with Black will expect us to play d2-d4 now or at some later point. However, the idea of the Reti Opening is to postpone this move until necessary or not play it at all. Therefore, we start with a flexible move 4.Nc3. White is waiting to see what variation of the Slav Defence our opponent will go for. It is important to note that we avoid the Classical Slav (1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 dxc4) with this move order because 4...dxc4 doesn't make sense for Black here.

    1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5 3.b3 - Principled Approach and Sidelines

    The last lecture of the camp is dedicated to the line 1.Nf3 d5 2.e3 c5

    Reti-Opening-8-623b2ddee1

    This is the 'Principled approach' against the Reti Opening with 2.e3. Black takes the available space in the center and prepares to develop his queenside pieces in the most active manner. He does not aim to get any particular type of well-known defense, such as those discussed in the first three lectures. Instead, this move has independent value, as Black discourages 3.c4 by preparing 3...d4. However, as usual in this system, White can use his first-move advantage to put pressure on the black center.

    At this point, we will opt for 3.b3.

    GM Kuljasevic recommends this move instead of 3.d4, which transposes to a good version of the Colle Attack for Black. As usual in the Reti Opening/Keymer System, we postpone the d-pawn advance and focus on development first. In essence, we now get a Queen's Indian  Defense with colors reversed and an extra tempo for White. Our goal is to make that tempo count and build on our slight development advantage. Black has a wide choice of replies to choose from. We can group them in the following way: 

    1) Layman's approach (...Nc6/...Nf6)

    2) Reversed Petrosian QID (...a5/...Nc6) 

    3) Reversed Fianchetto QID (...Nf6, g6)

    4) Reversed e3-QID (...Nf6, e6)

    5)  Ambitious ...f6 (with or without ...Nc6)

    In all cases, White has enough resources to fight for a slight edge.

    SAMPLE VARIATION

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